Period Embossed Victorian Tiles – Our range of modern ceramic wall tiles offers a new choice of colours incorporating a series of elegant cornices and mouldings. This range, evoking classic 19th Century designs is complemented by a functional and smart selection of solid glazed ceramic corner fittings to match the field tiles.

TILES IN THE PERIOD EMBOSSED VICTORIAN TILES RANGE

ADDITIONAL FITTINGS AVAILABLE

Floral - 9" x 6"
Floral - 9" x 6"
Pomegranate - 9" x 6"
Pomegranate - 9" x 6"
Fluted Skirt - 9" x 3"
Fluted Skirt - 9" x 3"
Dado - 9" x 2"
Dado - 9" x 2"
Dentil - 8"
Dentil - 8"
Wheat Sheaf - 6" x 3"
Wheat Sheaf - 6" x 3"
Royal Garland Dado - 6" x 3"
Royal Garland Dado - 6" x 3"
Crown - 6" x 1.5"
Crown - 6" x 1.5"
Cable - 6" x 1.5"
Cable - 6" x 1.5"
Imperial - 6" x 6"
Imperial - 6" x 6"
Thistle - 6" x 3"
Thistle - 6" x 3"
Leaf - 6" x 3"
Leaf - 6" x 3"
Metro - 75 x 75mm / 150 x 75mm
Metro - 75 x 75mm / 150 x 75mm
Skirting - 6" x 6"
Skirting - 6" x 6"
Plain
Plain - 6" x 6"; 6" x 3"; 9" x 3"; 4" x 4" and 8" x 4"
Royal Windsor Quarter - 6" x 6"
Royal Windsor Quarter - 6" x 6"
Garland Border - 6" x 6"
Garland Border - 6" x 6"
Medalion - 6" x 6"
Medalion - 6" x 6"
Minor Pendant 6" x 6"
Minor Pendant 6" x 6"

PERIOD EMBOSSED CORNERS

Period Embossed Cable Corner Tiles
CABLE CORNER
Period Embossed Skirting Corner Tiles
SKIRTING CORNER
Period Embossed Classic Corner
CLASSIC CORNER
Period Embossed Thistle Corner Tiles
THISTLE CORNER
Period Embossed Crown Corner Tiles
CROWN CORNER
STRAIGHT CORNER
Period Embossed Leaf Corner Tiles
LEAF CORNER
DOWNLOAD BROCHURE

Click on the images above that interest you. You will be able to view more information on your selected tile and request a sample*.

*Small colour match samples will be supplied unless otherwise requested

Victorian Tiles for Design

During the Victorian era there was a tremendous resurgence of interest in the use of tiles for all kinds of projects. Two principal design movements contributed to that increase in interest, the Gothic Revival, and the Arts and Crafts Movement. Individually patterned tiles, or tiles which could be laid together to form patterns, were now mechanically produced in volume. There were two distinct advantages here, standardisation of size and significant cost savings. During the 19th Century, these tiles appeared increasingly in public buildings including for churches and schools. They also came to be used in home hallways and bathrooms. For other uses, more resilient encaustic tile were used. Tiles for application on walls greatly increased in popularity during this period; the rise in numbers of homes incorporating a the bathroom contributing significantly to this! Kitchen hygiene standards were rising rapidly as well and this led directly to the increased use of tiles here as a result.